The Canadian Parliament will meet today (17 Feb – 10:00 AM local time) to begin debate on the Emergency Act. See page for details and links to the streamed version of the proceedings.

Photo: Flag flies in front of Canada’s Parliament Building

17 February 2022 | James Porteous | Clipper Media

The Canadian Parliament will today (17 Feb 2022) begin debate over the recently introduced Emergency Act. Oppositon politicians have noted that ‘the invoking of the Act comes at the same time many of the blockades are being lifted through local law enforcement.’

As noted below, as part of the parliamentary oversight requirements in invoking powers under the Emergencies Act, the government must table a motion in both the House and Senate within seven sitting days outlining why federal officials feel the powers are required and detailing what specific measures will be taken, to allow the two parliamentary bodies to confirm it.

Now that the motion is tabled, debate will begin Thursday and will continue, according to the Act, “without interruption” until the vote is ready to be called — essentially when the list of speakers has been exhausted or if the government imposes closure on the debate.

The debate will be carried in full on at least one of Canada’s Parliamentary channels, both of which are streamed online.

The links below will be updated on this page as needed. Debate appears to be slated to begin at 10:00 AM local time.

PARVU: Sitting No. 33 House of Commons (LINK) (YouTube) Both links confirmed

Scheduled: Thursday, Feb 17, 2022: 10:00 – 19:00 : 9 Hours

CPAC: HOUSE OF COMMONS PROCEEDINGS (LINK)

Procedure and House Affairs – February 17, 2022

Canada’s elected officials debate the issues of the day in the House of Commons.

James Porteous / Clipper Media

Conservatives not backing Emergencies Act, MPs to debate motion Thursday

Sarah Turnbull CTVNews.ca Producer

@TurnbullSarah ContactP ublished Wednesday, February 16, 2022 

Interim Conservative Leader Candice Bergen says the party won’t be supporting a motion tabled by the federal government that would give them the powers to enforce the Emergencies Act.

Leaving a Conservative caucus meeting, Bergen said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau didn’t attempt to thoroughly rectify the protesting and blockades in Ottawa and elsewhere with the existing powers he had.

“The first act that he does when he has a chance to do something – he doesn’t go through step one, two, three – he goes straight to 100 and invokes the Emergencies Act,” she said.

“I don’t think anything that we will see will change our mind, we will be opposing it.”

Bergen noted that the invoking of the Act comes at the same time many of the blockades are being lifted through local law enforcement.

“It really begs the question, why he would take this drastic action?”

Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino tabled the motion in the House of Commons late Wednesday evening, as well as the proclamation declaring a public order emergency.

In a subsequent tweet, Government House Leader Mark Holland said he expects a “fulsome” debate and after discussions with other parties is prepared to consider “constructive ideas” on how to adjust the schedule of the House so that many MPs can participate.

“I look forward to this historic debate. It is essential that this matter be dealt with urgently, and that a vote be held before the end of the upcoming constituency week for MPs,” he said.

As part of the parliamentary oversight requirements in invoking powers under the Emergencies Act, the government must table a motion in both the House and Senate within seven sitting days outlining why federal officials feel the powers are required and detailing what specific measures will be taken, to allow the two parliamentary bodies to confirm it.

Now that the motion is tabled, debate will begin Thursday and will continue, according to the Act, “without interruption” until the vote is ready to be called — essentially when the list of speakers has been exhausted or if the government imposes closure on the debate.

The emergency powers will remain in effect if the motion is adopted, which is expected given the NDP have signalled they’ll support the Liberals.

“We’re reluctant in making this decision to support, we’ll listen very carefully to the debate before we place our votes but we have indicated that we are supportive of taking a serious step to respond to this crisis,” said NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on Wednesday.

However, getting it passed through the Upper Chamber remains to be seen. The Senate has been recalled to consider the matter on Friday morning.

Late Tuesday night the government issued the regulations outlining in more detail what powers are being enacted though the act.

Among them are safeguarding vaccine clinics, banning children from protests and blockade sites, protecting war memorials, and directing essential services.

Justice Minister David Lametti said these regulations will be tabled in the House of Commons by the end of Thursday.

“Looking ahead, both the House of Commons and Senate will soon have the opportunity to debate and vote on the emergency declaration…Parliament can amend or revoke any orders we have made. This is an important democratic check and balance in the act,” he said speaking to reporters on Wednesday.

Lametti sought to comfort Canadians who are concerned that the move would infringe on personal rights and freedoms.

“It is allowing us to use targeted and proportional measures to help bring the illegal blockades and occupations to an end. And critically, all of our actions under the Emergencies Act will comply with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. That requirement is built into the legislation itself,” he said.

Despite the assurance of the act’s scope, Conservative MPs are calling the move a “power grab.”

“There is no national emergency, there is no threat to the security of Canada, the protests at the border were peacefully taken down and I think it’s an overreach,” said Conservative MP Marilyn Gladu.

“[The prime minister] did not act with his existing powers. So for him to grab even further powers, and very far-reaching powers, is very troubling.”

With files from CTV News’ Rachel Aiello.